VET SERVICES

Looking for veterinary services in Lake Oswego?

Oswego Veterinary Hospital is made up of three examination rooms, an operating room, x-ray room, laboratory/pharmacy, reception area, boarding suites, a grooming spa, and beautiful gardens. We offer a variety of services for cats, dogs, pocket pets and birds!

We offer wellness plans for ongoing preventative care, as well as as-needed visits to keep your pets healthy, happy, and playing.

Learn more about our veterinary services:

  • Preventative Care
  • Surgery
  • Alternative Therapies
  • Microchip Pet ID
  • Wellness For Dogs
  • Wellness for Cats
PREVENTATIVE CARE

The best way to treat your cat or dog for heartworms, fleas, and ticks is by stopping them before they even start to become a problem for your family pet.

Does heartworm prevention work?
Treatment for heartworm infection is expensive —and it can potentially kill your dog. There is no approved treatment for cats. Some cats spontaneously rid themselves of the infection; others might not survive it. And even one or two adult heartworms in a cat can cause serious problems.

Fortunately, there’s an easy way to keep your dog or cat safe: by administering monthly heartworm preventives. Most heartworm medications also protect your pet against other parasites, such as roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, ear mites, fleas, and ticks.

We can recommend the best regimen of prevention for your pet. Contact us today!

What tick prevention does for you and your pet:
Ticks are becoming more and more prevalent in North America, and they’re now being found in areas where people and pets didn’t previously encounter ticks. These parasites can cause serious—and sometimes deadly—diseases, including Lyme disease.

The best method for keeping ticks off your pet is by keeping your dog or cat on a tick preventive. Even indoor-only pets are at risk because ticks can hitch a ride inside on your clothing or shoes.

Don’t panic if you find a tick on your dog or cat, even if your pet is on a preventive. Some preventives kill ticks after they’ve come in contact with your pet. Ticks can hide easily under your pet’s fur, so as an added measure of protection, we recommend checking your pet for ticks every time your pet comes in from outside.

Tick preventives are safe and highly effective at controlling ticks and the diseases they carry. We carry multiple tick prevention products for cats and dogs and would be happy to help find the best one for your pet.

Contact us immediately if your pet starts coughing, has joint pain, trouble breathing, fever, weakness, or loss of appetite, weight, energy, or coordination.

Vaccinating your dog for Leptospirosis
Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease of humans and animals. In humans and dogs alike, it causes a wide range of symptoms from very mild flu-like symptoms to liver and/or kidney failure. It has re-emerged in North America with such force that professionals at the Centers for Disease Control say they now consider the disease a notable source of mortality.

How is it spread?
The primary method of transmission is via water contaminated with urine, although urine-contaminated soil, bedding or foods are also routes of exposure in addition to blood or saliva. Leptospirosis can be spread by dogs, coyotes, rats, raccoons, possums, several other common mammals, and humans.

Which dogs should be vaccinated?
Most authorities agree on the following indicators for vaccinating for leptospirosis:
Animals in geographical areas with defined wet seasons – our part of Oregon fits this description.
Animals in geographic areas where there is a known prevalence or outbreak of the disease.
Animals who frequent any type of communal area shared by multiple dogs such as neighborhood dog parks, grooming salons or boarding facilities.

Is there a risk in vaccinating?
There is risk involved with every vaccine. The reaction rate for the current vaccine is less than 3%, with the majority of those reactions being soreness at the injection site post-vaccination. The newest vaccines have significantly increased the efficacy of the vaccine, while simultaneously reducing the incidence of reactions as well. Due to the factors above, most authorities on the topic agree that for our area, the risk of the disease is greater than the risk of vaccinating.

SURGERY

At Oswego Veterinary Hospital, our doctors perform a wide array of surgery including spays and neuters, mass removals and biopsies, intestinal foreign body removals, wound repairs, and surgeries of the bladder, eye, ear and oral cavity.

Spaying
Spaying prevents female animals from becoming pregnant and also protects them against potentially deadly diseases including bacterial infections, reproductive tract diseases, and several types of cancer. Spaying (ovariohysterectomy) involves removing the ovaries and uterus while your pet is under anesthesia.

Once your pet is spayed, you won’t have to worry about her going into heat. This means avoiding the mess that often accompanies the heat cycle in female dogs and the pacing, crying and screaming that happens with female cats.

We utilize the same high anesthetic standards for our spays as we use on all our anesthetic procedures, and each patient’s pain and comfort are managed from before surgery even starts until days after they have returned home.

Neutering
This procedure, which prevents male animals from reproducing, reduces or eliminates his risk for prostate and testicular cancer, as well as sexually transmitted diseases. Neutering will also reduce or eliminate undesirable and embarrassing behavior, including roaming, fighting, humping, and spraying.

Neutering, which involves removing the testicles, is a surgical procedure and is performed with the pet under anesthesia. We utilize the same high anaesthetic standards for our spays as we use on all our anesthetic procedures, and each patient’s pain and comfort are managed from before surgery even starts until days after they have returned home.

Spaying or neutering your pet will not change their personality. It can help your dog or cat live a longer, healthier life and helps control the dog and cat overpopulation problem, minimizing the number of animals that need to be in shelters.

We’re happy to answer any questions or concerns you may have about pet surgery.

Soft Tissue Surgery
Soft tissue surgeries are those that are not associated with bone. The most common soft tissue surgery performed on pets is the removal of masses or lumps. Most of these masses, once removed and tested, are found to be benign (non-harmful); however, occasionally they are more serious. Early removal and accurate diagnosis of a lump is necessary to improve the outcome in your pet if the mass is cancerous.

If your dog suffers from frequent ear infections or ear masses, surgical intervention can reduce their occurrence by improving airflow into the ear canal.

Surgery can also help resolve several problems related to the eyes. Tearing in your pet’s eyes can mean an infection is present or may be a sign that the cornea (outer layer of the eye) has been damaged. Surgery may allow the cornea to heal faster with less scarring, improving your pet’s ability to see. In some pets, the eyelashes or masses on the eyelids may actually irritate or damage the cornea. Surgical intervention improves comfort in these pets, reduces the chances of corneal scarring, and enhances the pet’s vision in the long term.

Local Anesthesia
If your pet is having a minor surgical or diagnostic procedure performed, we often use a local anesthetic to help control pain. For example, when we perform a biopsy (in which a small portion of tissue is surgically removed so it can be examined), we often use a local anesthetic to numb the area.

Local anesthetics cause a loss of sensation in the area where the procedure is being performed. We may use a sedative and/or anxiolytic (anti-anxiety medication) in combination with the local anesthetic to keep pets calm during a procedure.

General Anesthesia
For some procedures, your pet will need to be administered general anesthesia so that he or she will be unconscious and not feel pain. Every surgery patient has their own dedicated anesthetist who cares for and monitors them throughout their stay.

We can assure you that modern anesthesia is generally quite safe; to further lower any risk, we perform a physical examination and run blood work ahead of time to catch any underlying health issues. In addition, we follow a specific anesthetic protocol, including monitoring vital signs during the procedure, to ensure the safety of our patients.

ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES

Acupuncture, an ancient practice which uses needles placed in specific locations on the body, has been shown to cause the release of the body’s natural painkillers. Practiced for thousands of years on people and animals alike, veterinary acupuncture is a wonderful natural treatment for your beloved pet.

Yes, acupuncture can help your pet!

At Oswego Vet, we use acupuncture in conjunction with our Western medical therapy to help reduce the need for medications for a variety of pet concerns such as:

  • Pain and weakness associated with arthritis and spinal disc disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Gastrointestinal diabetes
  • Lower urinary tract disease
  • Allergies

What to expect from an acupuncture visit:
Your first appointment with Dr. Duggan will be an hour long, and she’ll go over your pet’s medical history and health concerns. She will examine your pet with both Western and Chinese medicine techniques and start a plan for treatment. We may need additional Western medical testing to help guide our acupuncture to ensure that we have the safest and most effective plan possible.

Like humans, animal responses to acupuncture can vary.
Most pets are very tolerant of the needles, but it can take a little while for them to get used to the idea, especially for some of the points around the head and feet. As endorphins are released, many will become very relaxed and come to enjoy their visits!

Most conditions require three to four weekly treatments to resolve the issue. For chronic health conditions, we can then drop this frequency to maintain your pet’s improved health.

A day or two after treatment, older pets especially may feel a little more tired before they feel better.

If you’d like to learn more about veterinary acupuncture check out these online resources:

For patients who may not tolerate needles, our Companion Laser Therapy is a great alternative
Photons of laser light penetrate deep into tissue and are absorbed into the cells which initiate a photochemical response. This response in the cells blocks nerve impulses accelerates tissue repair, increases circulation and reduces swelling.

Laser Therapy for cats and dogs
If your pet is in pain or has an area of injury or inflammation, laser therapy can help them heal and reduce pain. This includes patients that have the aches and pains due to old age, have just had a surgical procedure, or who have an open wound or recent injury.

Laser Therapy is used to:

  • Reduce pain and discomfort
  • Speed healing
  • Increase mobility and motion in joints
  • Reduce swelling

Your pet is in good company when receiving Laser Therapy. It is being used by over 2000 veterinary hospitals, physical therapists, and orthopedic specialists.

Veterinary Specialist Referrals
Although we handle the majority of your pet’s medical and surgical needs in-house, we occasionally refer patients to veterinary specialists or specialty clinics when advanced training or equipment will be beneficial.

Board-certified specialists, such as oncologists, cardiologists, ophthalmologists, and neurologists, have extensive experience and training in a particular area of veterinary medicine or surgery. Specialty clinics and university-affiliated referral centers have specialized equipment to perform procedures that are not routinely performed by general veterinary practitioners.

We make referral decisions because we want to ensure that our patients receive the highest standard of care and the best possible outcome. Be assured that when we refer a patient to another hospital, we continue to stay involved with his or her care, consulting with the treating specialist and often providing any needed follow-up care and rehabilitation.

MICROCHIPPING

Microchipping your pet is a safe, permanent way to identify your pet in case he or she becomes lost. A microchip, which is a tiny device about the size and shape of a grain of rice, is placed just under the loose skin at the back of the neck.

Even the most responsible pet owners can’t always guarantee their pet won’t get lost. A leash could break or slip out of your hand, a pet could push through a screen door or window, or a contractor or friend might accidentally leave a door or gate open.

How pet microchipping works:
When a lost dog or cat without an ID tag is found, a veterinarian or vet technician will use a handheld microchip scanner to check for a chip. If the pet has one, it will transmit its ID number to the scanner via a low-frequency radio wave. The veterinary hospital or shelter then calls the chip manufacturer, retrieves the pet owner’s contact information, and calls the owner.

We recommend that you use a microchip, along with a collar and ID tag, to identify your pet. An ID tag is still a reliable identification method. Pets that have tags with current contact information are more likely to not end up in shelters and tend to get home faster than those without tags.

However, collars and ID tags aren’t permanent and can be removed (overnight or for grooming); pets can also lose them. With a microchip, your pet will have a much better chance of being identified and returned to you. Pets without microchips that end up in shelters may be adopted out to another family or even euthanized.

We can microchip ferrets, rabbits, birds, and other companion animals, too!
Imagine if your dog or cat got lost. You’d want to give him or her the best chance of getting home. With microchipping, you can!

CANINE INFLUENZA

Canine Influenza has been in the news quite a bit recently and for good reason; below we offer information to help you make the best decision for your dog’s health regarding this virus.

THE STRAINS

The canine influenza virus (CIV) is a viral respiratory infection found primarily in dogs but which can also affect cats. There have been two identified strains of the virus in the US: H3N8 and H3N2. These viruses are considered to be prevalent in the United States.

H3N8

The first evidence of H3N8 canine influenza in companion dogs was documented in spring 2005. It is believed to have jumped species from horses and was first identified in an outbreak of respiratory illness in racing dogs in Florida in 2004. H3N8 does not affect cats.

H3N2

In 2015, a canine influenza outbreak in the Midwest was determined to have been caused by the H3N2 subtype, which had been circulating in Asian dogs since 2007. This month there was an outbreak of H3N2 CIV in the South Bay area of California. This virus appears to spread faster, shed longer, and have the potential to be more serious than the H3N8 strain. To date, there have been no positive cases in Oregon (January 2018).

SYMPTOMS

Canine influenza is an airborne disease; much like kennel cough (Bordetella bronchiseptica). The virus can travel in droplets from a cough or sneeze and can be transmitted by contact with contaminated objects (for instance, a chew toy). The most common clinical signs are;

  • Coughing.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Lethargy.
  • Fever.
  • Sneezing.
  • Discharge from the eyes and/or nose.

Dogs can become ill within 24 hours of exposure. Some dogs don’t show symptoms but are able to infect other dogs for weeks. Most dogs diagnosed with canine influenza experience a mild form of the disease. Unfortunately, dogs in the US have no immunity to influenza, and therefore nearly all exposed dogs will become infected.

Cats can potentially get this from dogs but the transmission is low- there is no vaccine for cats so we would only suggest people separate sick dogs from cats.

ACTION STEPS FOR YOU

Practically speaking, if your dog stays at home and rarely contacts other dogs, its risk of contracting the virus is likely low. If your dog is boarded, goes to daycare, or the dog park, it may be at a higher risk.

If your dog is coughing, it should not go to public places where it could contact other dogs until your veterinarian agrees it’s safe for your dog to go out.

Call us if your dog develops a cough, especially if it has already received the Bordetella vaccine. If your dog is coughing, do not take it out to locations where it may infect other dogs, including grooming or boarding environments. Early intervention is key to limiting community outbreaks.

Be sure to let us know if your dog has been boarded, visited the groomer or was involved in any social activities (dog park, daycare, etc.) within the last month.

SHOULD YOUR DOG BE VACCINATED

We treat every patient as an individual and we take multiple factors into consideration when we partner with you to make these types of decisions. Some factors we will discuss include; over-all health status, exposure to other dogs, and even your own risk tolerance. We will begin carrying vaccine for BOTH strains to ensure best coverage in any and all lifestyle situations.

The vaccine is two doses about three weeks apart.

Dogs will NOT be protected until 10-14 days after their 2nd booster, so you will want to plan ahead if you will be traveling to an area of possible exposure.

This vaccine needs to be boostered yearly.
Side effects, if any, tend to be soreness and lethargy.
No vaccine is 100% effective but vaccinated dogs tend to have milder clinical signs.
>>> Cornell University Canine Influenza Tracking Map

As always, we are here for any questions or concerns you may have and we are honored to be part of your pet’s health care team.

WELLNESS CARE FOR DOGS

We understand that veterinary care can be expensive, and pet wellness plans may encourage people to visit their veterinarian more often. Resulting in the best possible care for your best furry friend.

Our Commitment To Care program offers unlimited dog examinations for one yearly fee of $205 so that concerns can be addressed as frequently as needed without the expense of an exam fee each time.

A wellness exam typically includes:

  • A physical assessment, checking your dog from nose to tail
  • Discussion and recommendations of appropriate vaccinations and preventives
  • A diagnostic workup which may include blood, fecal, and urine tests to check for parasites and underlying diseases
  • Dental care recommendations
  • Commitment to care for puppies

Congratulations on your new puppy!
Our Commitment to Care Program is designed to help get your puppy started on the right path to a long and healthy life. The first few months are a critical period in your puppy’s development, and we can give you the support and tools necessary to help him or her grow into a well-mannered, healthy dog, including information and advice on nutrition, training, behavior, and socialization.

Schedule your puppy for his or her first exam as soon as possible. Until your puppy has received a series of vaccines, he or she is susceptible to many serious but preventable diseases.

Keep your whole family safe by getting it’s newest member seen for a wellness visit right away.

Adult dog commitment to care wellness plan
Like humans the risks of arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hormone disorders, kidney and liver problems all increase with age for dogs.

Bringing your pet in for an annual diagnostic and wellness checkup can help reassure you that your dog is healthy and help us detect hidden diseases or conditions early. Early detection can improve the prognosis of many diseases, keep medical costs down, and help your pet live longer.

We would be happy to discuss our Commitment to Care program in more detail, just give us a call.

Senior dog pet commitment to care wellness plan
Before your dog reaches senior status, they should be seen yearly for exams and regular diagnostic screening. This gives us a baseline of what’s normal for your pet so we can identify any trends or evaluate for changes if and when they do become sick. When your dog turns around 7, they are considered a senior and we start screening for more senior-related diseases.

We treat issues often associated with old age such as:

  • Arthritis
  • Cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Heart disease
  • Hormone disorders
  • Kidney and liver problems
  • Diseases associated with cognitive dysfunction syndrome (similar to Alzheimer’s in humans)

We can also improve your pet’s quality of life with more frequent exams and age-based recommendations specific to your pet’s needs.

WELLNESS CARE FOR CATS

Unlimited wellness exams for a year: our commitment to care program!

Bringing your pet in for an annual diagnostic and wellness checkups can help reassure you that your cat is healthy and help us detect hidden diseases or conditions early. Early detection can improve the prognosis of many diseases, keep medical costs down, and help your pet live longer. A wellness exam typically includes:

  • A physical assessment, checking your cat from nose to tail
  • Appropriate vaccinations and preventives
  • A diagnostic workup which may include blood, fecal, and urine tests to check for parasites and underlying diseases
  • We may also recommend that your pet receive dental care
  • We appreciate that veterinary care can be expensive, for this reason, our Commitment To Care Program provides unlimited doctor examinations
  • for a single yearly fee.
  • Get unlimited vet visits and peace of mind to you as a pet parent all year for only $205
  • Commitment to care for kittens

The first few months are a critical period in your kitten’s development, and we can give you the support and tools necessary to help him or her grow into a well-mannered, healthy cat, including information and advice on nutrition, litterbox training, and behavior.

Schedule your kitten for his or her first exam as soon as possible. Until your kitten has received a series of vaccines, he or she is susceptible to many serious but preventable diseases. We will make sure your new pet is protected against rabies and panleukopenia (distemper). In addition, your kitten will need to be tested and treated for parasites, which are common in young cats.

By ensuring that your kitten is properly treated, you can keep your entire family safe.

Ongoing care for adult cats
Cats age far quicker than humans, so it is even more crucial for our companion animals to receive regular exams. In addition, the risks of arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hormone disorders, and kidney and liver problems all increase with age.

Because you spend the most time with your pet, you are your pet’s expert, as well as his or her greatest advocate. Please let us know if you’ve noticed any physical or behavioral changes in your pet, as well as any other concerns you might have.

Ongoing care for senior cats
When your cat turns around 8, they are considered a senior and we start screening for more senior related diseases.We can treat many symptoms that are commonly attributed to age such as:

  • Arthritis
  • Cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Heart disease
  • Hormone disorders such as hyperthyroidism
  • Kidney and liver problems
  • Diseases associated with cognitive dysfunction syndrome (similar to Alzheimer’s in humans)

We can also improve your pet’s quality of life by identifying and preventing or reducing pain, recommending an appropriate nutrition and exercise plan, and suggesting environmental modifications to keep your pet comfortable.

BIRDS

Birds can develop many of the same medical conditions as dogs and cats as well as a variety of illnesses unique to birds. When birds do get sick, they often show few physical signs until they are very ill. If your bird is exhibiting any of the following symptoms seek immediate veterinary care.

  • Bobbing their tail as they breathe
  • Unable to perch and down on the bottom of the cage
  • Constantly fluffed with their eyes closed
  • Has to hook their beak on the bars of the cage for support

We encourage regular visits as an important way to help ensure the overall health and longevity of pet birds.

Common health issues for birds:

In general, birds tend to be healthy and hardy pets. Most often what we see here at Oswego Veterinary Hospital include:

  • Traumatic injuries from cat or dog bites
  • Flight injuries
  • Blood feather trauma
  • Fractures or accidents involving the cage or toys
  • Respiratory disease
  • Feather picking
  • Chronic egg laying
  • Parasitism

Annual exams including periodic fecal and blood tests are important in order to diagnose and treat disease early.

Our team is dedicated to helping birds live longer, healthier lives

Birds can have very unique needs. Oswego Vet can provide guidance about proper nutrition, training, hygiene, grooming and how to facilitate social interactions with other pets and family members.

Aviary nutrition, nail trims and more!

Our veterinarians can determine if your bird is healthy and at a good body weight, as well as discuss methods to make any necessary dietary transitions. We’ll evaluate your bird for beak or wing trims and provide when necessary. We can also trim your bird’s nails, or teach you how to trim them at home.

Helpful links to avian health:

POCKET PETS

Just because they’re small doesn’t mean they can’t benefit from veterinary attention. Just like other pets, Guinea Pigs, Gerbils, and Hamsters need daily interaction with people and they’re unique in that, just like humans and other primates, they need dietary sources of vitamin C.

Common pocket pet problems:

  • Diarrhea
  • Dental disease
  • Parasites
  • Skin infections (Abscesses)

At Oswego Veterinary Hospital we recommend annual health exams for all guinea pigs and pocket pets. It’s a good idea to get a physical exam for a baseline as soon as you get your new pet to start them out on the right track. Yearly check-ups will help to keep them happy and healthy.

Ongoing care for rats
Rats can get a bad rap! They are actually smart, fun, clean and social pets! Of all of the small creatures we call “pocket pets”, rats have to be the sweetest, friendliest and some of the smartest little rodents around. Rats make excellent pets and tend to be easy to care for, forming strong bonds with their owners.

Common problems:

  • Mammary Tumors
  • Respiratory Problems/Pneumonia
  • Skin Problems

Come by and let us meet your new furry friend at the time of adoption. Regular check-ups every 6 months are recommended to help keep your rat happy, and living a longer, healthier life.

Veterinary care for rabbits

Domestic rabbits make gentle, quiet, affectionate pets with lifespans ranging from 5-8 years or more. Like any pet, they require lots of social interaction and a time commitment to stay healthy and happy.

We recommend that all pet rabbits are spayed or neutered around 4 to 6 months of age. By spaying female rabbits, you eliminate the chance of uterine cancer which commonly occurs in unspayed older female rabbits. A neutered pet also makes a much happier companion and pet rabbits are less likely to spray or become aggressive if they are altered.

Common Problems:

  • Respiratory diseases
  • Urinary tract problems
  • Head tilt
  • Sore hocks
  • Dental disease involving overgrown teeth
  • Diarrhea
  • Heat stroke
  • Parasitic infections

An annual exam will help to keep your rabbit on the right track to living a long, healthy and happy life.

Call us if your pocket pet stops eating, loses weight, appears quieter than normal, has discharge from the eyes or nose, or develops a lump on its body. We can provide treatment that fits within your budget.

We love new clients!

Call to schedule an appointment or fill out our New Client Registration Form. A member of our team will be in touch to help you schedule your first appointment after we receive your information. We look forward to meeting you and your pets soon!

Location

590 Third Street
Lake Oswego, Oregon, 97034
Click here for directions.

Hours

Mon: 7:30am – 8:00pm
Tues: 7:30am – 8:00pm
Wed: 7:30am – 6:00pm
Thurs: 7:30am – 6:00pm
Fri: 7:30am – 6:00pm
Sat: 8:30am – 5:00pm
Sun: Closed

Contact Us

Phone503-636-3001
Fax: 503-699-9367
Emailreception@oswegovet.com

Learn more about our services!

Oswego Veterinary Hospital is made up of three examination rooms, an operating room, x-ray room, laboratory/pharmacy, reception area, boarding suites, a grooming spa and beautiful gardens.

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