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Pet Surgery

Expert pet surgery in your neighborhood

At Oswego Veterinary Hospital, our doctors perform a wide array of surgery including spays and neuters, mass removals and biopsies, intestinal foreign body removals, wound repairs, and surgeries of the bladder, eye, ear and oral cavity.

Spaying

Spaying prevents female animals from becoming pregnant and also protects them against potentially deadly diseases including bacterial infections, reproductive tract diseases, and several types of cancer. Spaying (ovariohysterectomy) involves removing the ovaries and uterus while your pet is under anesthesia.

Once your pet is spayed, you won’t have to worry about her going into heat. This means avoiding the mess that often accompanies the heat cycle in female dogs and the pacing, crying and screaming that happens with female cats.

We utilize the same high anesthetic standards for our spays as we use on all our anesthetic procedures, and each patient’s pain and comfort are managed from before surgery even starts until days after they have returned home.

Neutering

This procedure, which prevents male animals from reproducing, reduces or eliminates his risk for prostate and testicular cancer, as well as sexually transmitted diseases. Neutering will also reduce or eliminate undesirable and embarrassing behavior, including roaming, fighting, humping, and spraying.

Neutering, which involves removing the testicles, is a surgical procedure and is performed with the pet under anesthesia. We utilize the same high anesthetic standards for our spays as we use on all our anesthetic procedures, and each patient’s pain and comfort are managed from before surgery even starts until days after they have returned home.

Spaying or neutering your pet will not change their personality. It can help your dog or cat live a longer, healthier life and helps control the dog and cat overpopulation problem, minimizing the number of animals that need to be in shelters.

We’re happy to answer any questions or concerns you may have about pet surgery.

 

Soft Tissue Surgery

Soft tissue surgeries are those that are not associated with bone. The most common soft tissue surgery performed on pets is the removal of masses, or lumps. Most of these masses, once removed and tested, are found to be benign (non-harmful); however, occasionally they are more serious. Early removal and accurate diagnosis of a lump is necessary to improve the outcome in your pet if the mass is cancerous.

If your dog suffers from frequent ear infections or ear masses, surgical intervention can reduce their occurrence by improving airflow into the ear canal.

Surgery can also help resolve several problems related to the eyes. Tearing in your pet’s eyes can mean an infection is present or may be a sign that the cornea (outer layer of the eye) has been damaged. Surgery may allow the cornea to heal faster with less scarring, improving your pet’s ability to see. In some pets, the eyelashes or masses on the eyelids may actually irritate or damage the cornea. Surgical intervention improves comfort in these pets, reduces the chances of corneal scarring, and enhances the pet’s vision in the long term.

Contact us if you’d like to discuss how soft tissue surgery might be able to help your pet.

 

Local Anesthesia

If your pet is having a minor surgical or diagnostic procedure performed, we often use a local anesthetic to help control pain. For example, when we perform a biopsy (in which a small portion of tissue is surgically removed so it can be examined), we often use a local anesthetic to numb the area.

Local anesthetics cause a loss of sensation in the area where the procedure is being performed. We may use a sedative and/or anxiolytic (anti-anxiety medication) in combination with the local anesthetic to keep pets calm during a procedure.

General Anesthesia

For some procedures, your pet will need to be administered general anesthesia so that he or she will be unconscious and not feel pain. Every surgery patient has their own dedicated anesthetist who cares for and monitors them throughout their stay.

We can assure you that modern anesthesia is generally quite safe; to further lower any risk, we perform a physical examination and run blood work ahead of time to catch any underlying health issues. In addition, we follow a specific anesthetic protocol, including monitoring vital signs during the procedure, to ensure the safety of our patients.